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Will I Ever See That Movie? Cause I Ain’t Getting Any Younger!

There comes a point in every film buff’s life when you’ve got to ask yourself one question……

“Do I feel lucky?”

Scratch that, damn movie quotes are always bubbling to the surface.

No what I’m wanting to ask myself is, “Am I ever going to see that film?”

Let me explain. There are plenty of movies I’ve yet to see and some I’m embarrassed to even admit too. But those are titles readily available should I make the decision to finally sit down and watch them. Mainstream stuff that for one reason or another I’ve never bothered with. No what I’m talking about are movies that may be lesser known to the general population but have been on my radar for a number of reasons. Might be a genre I’m a fan of or more likely there’s an actor in it that I’ve long been a fan of.

Case in point would be the 1949 Bing Crosby/Barry Fitzgerald movie, Top O’ The Morning. I was beginning to wonder if it was a lost film or perhaps in a legal struggle as to who owns the rights. To the best of my knowledge I hadn’t once come across it on television as a youngster who would comb through the weekly TV Guide in search of late night treasures that would keep me up my well past my specified bed time. And yes I used to sneak back downstairs in ninja gear to our basement and turn the TV back on with the volume oh so low so that Mom and dad wouldn’t suspect a thing. I’d always loved Going My Way and Welcome Stranger with Bing and Barry but the Irish tale that was to be their last pairing seemed to be a lost film. It has yet to turn up on any of those Bing Crosby DVD box sets so I’d almost given up on it. Then out of nowhere TCM played it and I had the PVR at the ready. Thankfully it does indeed live on and now I can place a checkmark beside it.

All of this brings me to some titles that are still yet to surface in my world and believe me when I tell you, I’m not getting any younger so I’m starting to have some doubts as to whether I’ll ever see some of the films I’m about to highlight. Now let me stress that some of these may be down right dogs but that’s not the point. As a film fanatic I’d like to make that determination for myself. Most of the titles you’ll see listed below have next to no votes as to a rating over at the IMDB which tells me they are rarely shown outside of some bootleg copies that might be kicking around. Kick’em my way if you please.

I’d also like to point out I’ve not gone into the TV Movies that were weekly affairs from the mid 1960’s into the late 1980’s. These are tragically neglected and one does have to wonder if in large part they will all but disappear as has the silent film in large numbers.

So if you see something in the my ramblings below, be sure to set me on the right course and remember this was off the cuff so I could just as easily come up with another list next week. So here we go………

Might as well start with the Duke on skates. This 1937 flick has long been a curiosity I’ve hungered for.

Alongside this unlikely hockey movie starring Duke are another pair of titles he made for Universal Studios I’ve yet to locate, Adventure’s End, and I Cover the War. All three titles were released in 1937 and notably none were westerns.

Always one to enjoy a good boxing match I’ve yet to come across some 1950’s titles that include 51’s Iron Man starring Jeff Chandler and Rock Hudson, Audie Murphy taking to the ring in 56’s The World In My Corner or a 1955 fight flick starring Tony Curtis and Ernest Borgnine. Could there be a knockout among them?

Getting back to Jeff Chandler, he alone represents a number of films that I’ve yet to come across. A Raw Wind In Eden, Because of You, A Stranger In My Arms and Smuggler’s Island are all titles that have so far kept me waiting.

Chandler also made a movie with Jack Palance I’d like to see, 1954’s Sign of the Pagan. Which brings us to Jack. I’ve had no luck in playing witness to some of Euro flicks he made abroad in the 60’s. Beyond All Limits, Revak the Rebel aka The Barbarians, The Mongols with Anita Ekberg, Night Train to Milan, Warriors Five and Sword of the Conqueror. Oddly enough I have a one sheet for that final title in my collection but no film.

Moving on let’s chat up Dear old Oliver Reed. He apparently made two films with Peter Cushing that may not have even seen the light of day. A Touch of the Sun (1979) and another called Black Jack that apparently saw a limited release in 1981. Reed has another film I’d like to take in from ’73 called Dirty Weekend with Marcello Mastroianni. No such luck up till now. One more for good measure. A 1970 release with Ollie and his Brood co-star, Samantha Eggar, titled The Lady in the Car With Glasses and a Gun.

Like Ollie, Richard Harris was known to like his drink and apparently made some titles that have all but vanished as far as I can tell. A 1977 version of Gulliver’s Travels? Something called The Last Word found a release in 1979 where Harris costarred with Karen Black. Miss Black’s film credits alone could fill a book and drive one to drink like Harris in his youth if you tried to locate them all. I see she did star in something called Plan 10 From Outer Space released somewhere on some planet in some galaxy 1995 Earth time.

Alan Ladd and his most famous costar, Veronica Lake, in 1948’s Saigon. The duo made a number of Noir’s together but their final pairing seems to have gone AWOL on me. Over 8000 viewers have rated This Gun For Hire at the IMDB yet Saigon has only garnered a rating from a grand total of 243 people casting a vote. Again, must be a bootleg disc floating around. Knowing this I took a look at the films of Miss Lake and many are nowhere to be found. Bring On the Girls (1945-109 votes), Out of This World (1945-105 votes) or Hold That Blonde (1945-112 votes),

Moving on we have Miss Susie Slagel’s (1946-104 votes), and Isn’t It Romantic (1948- only 55 votes). A 1951 release titled Stronghold costarring Zachary Scott looks like fun but again only 76 votes as to a rating at the IMDB. Lastly she also made a film with another of my favorite 50’s tough guys, Richard Widmark, called Slattery’s Hurricane. At least 409 people claim to have seen this one by casting their ratings vote. But I’m not one of them.

Being a fan of both Henry Fonda and Robert Ryan, I’m still on the lookout for a 1965 spy thriller known under various titles including The Dirty Game or if you prefer, The Secret Agents.

I know I’m not alone when it comes to the famous/infamous Jerry Lewis flick, The Day The Clown Cried. Every now and then I hear rumblings that it’s going to see the light of die. Hopefully I’m still walking above ground when it surfaces. On the subject of Lewis, I’m fully aware he made two 1984 features in France that to the best of my knowledge remain unseen here in North America. To Catch a Cop (1984) and How Did You Get In? We Didn’t See You Leave (1984). Lastly on the subject of Jerry, I was looking forward to seeing a late movie titled Max Rose, that I suppose never garnered enough traction and to be honest I’m remembering it now as I look over his credits. I’ll have to investigate where this 2013 film with a first rate cast disappeared to.

Being a Roddy McDowall fan since childhood thanks mainly to his participation in the Apes films and as a child actor in Lassie Come Home, I’ve been hoping to see a quartet of films he made at Monogram following his childhood years and before cementing his excellent character actor status. Rocky (1948 – 32 votes), Tuna Clipper (1949 – 20 votes), Black Midnight (1949 – 49 votes) and Big Timber (1950 – 43 votes). McDowall actually scored an executive producer credit on these as well as two other films he made for Monogram at this time. Both of which I have seen thanks to appearing on TCM, Killer Shark (1950) and Kidnapped (1948). Maybe they could dig these other four out of some long lost vault.

Just for fun I’ll throw out some one-offs. Robert Mitchum in 1965’s Mr. Moses. John Carradine in 1954’s Half Human. Joseph Cotton in 1951’s Peking Express. A Raoul Walsh flick from 1931 called Women of All Nations that apparently had scenes of Humphrey Bogart deleted and also has Bela Lugosi in the cast! Van Heflin and Ruth Roman in a 1954 adventure known as Tanganyika. Paul Douglas in a 1955  Noir flick called Joe MacBeth inspired by you know who…..

Peter Sellers had me in stitches as a child and still does when I revisit his classics. Which brings us to some maybe not so famous titles on his resume I’ve yet to come across. A straight drama from 1973 titled The Blockhouse. Undercovers Hero aka Soft Beds, Hard Battles (1974) and the notorious Ghost In the Noonday Sun (1973) which will not likely ever surface though I would like to see a recent documentary about the movie called The Ghost of Peter Sellers from director Peter Medak who guided the 1973 film.

Long being a western fan I’ve seen pretty much all of Glenn Ford’s oaters let alone movies. Having said that I can’t seem to sneak in a viewing of a 1951 western he made with Rhonda Fleming called The Redhead and the Cowboy. Speaking of the the Queen of Technicolor, how about a 1951 feature called Little Egypt. It’s scored a lowly 33 votes at the IMDb but how about this synopsis….. A belly dancer causes a scandal with her “suggestive” and “immoral” dancing at a Worlds Fair exhibition at the turn of the 20th century. Add this one to my list of movies I’d like to see before it’s too late!

Everyone’s favorite horror star/gourmet cook/art historian Vincent Price is an actor I always refer to as a good friend. Why not, he’s entertained me since childhood. But that doesn’t mean I’ve come across a pair of peplum flicks he made in the early 1960’s. Queen of the Nile and Rage of the Buccaneers. The same could likely be said of plenty of Hollywood actors who went abroad to film a Toga adventure once they caught on though some are readily available if you look for them. Even Alan Ladd signed on for one which is easily found, Duel of  Champions released in 1961.

Since we’ve touched upon Mr. Price, how about Sir Christopher Lee. Here’s a few titles I’ve yet to add to my collection let alone even come across. Beyond Mombasa (1956), The Devil’s Daffodil (1961), Eve (1968), Night of the Askari (1976), Dark Mission (1988) and Cyber Eden (1994).

I’m currently reading a biography of Peter Lorre titled The Lost One which brings me to Peter’s one and only directing effort of the same name. Now it turns out his one is on youtube with subtitles so I will be rectifying this omission on my dance card as soon as I’m done the extensively researched bio from writer Stephen D. Youngkin.

How about a pair of late Charlton Heston titles that seem to have been pushed aside. My Father (2003) and another released following his death. The 2010 flick, Genghis Khan : The Story of a Lifetime from two credited directors, Ken Annakin and Antonio Margheriti. The latter film also stars John Saxon who like Karen Black, it would be highly impossible to locate all of the many films he turned up in worldwide in most any genre. Looking over his credits list he starred in a Filipino movie, Desire (1982) that has a whopping 6 votes at the IMDB. Not high on my list of must sees but another example of just how many titles that are out there leaving me to wonder what or rather where do the negatives and copies disappear to.  

Pick any actor that’s been around for years with a lengthy list of screen credits and you’re sure to be left wondering about a few of them. Case in point. Bruce Dern. He’s still cranking them out but looking back I see he starred in a 1972 feature called Thumb Tripping. Only 89 votes cast so again, not sure if this really ever saw the light of day. From what I gather Bruce picks up a pair of hitchhikers played by Meg Foster and Michael Burns. The rest is anyone’s guess.

Foreign films can open a discussion all their own. It’s always been tough to track down films starring the likes of Alain Delon, Klaus Kinski, Marcello, Bardot, Toshiro, Ken Takakura, Belmondo, Gabin, Ventura, Cardinale, Magnani and the list goes on and on.  Might be easier overseas but not always on this side of the pond.

I could go on and on but I’ll end it with a 1951 Randolph Scott oater that for some reason hasn’t surfaced in my world.

One more thing before I sign off. Will any of us ever get to see this……

35 Comments »

  1. I have that same feeling with many films from Europe, there are just so many I wanna see and I don’t know if I’ll ever see them all in my lifetime, I haven’t made a goal such as yours, and in a way I’m kinda glad I didn’t because it leaves me quite a bit of room to take in what I’m absolutely curious or determined to see. Sometimes too, I think the journey might be more fun than the destination.

    • Yes the chase is always fun. Just that some of these never turn up and I wonder if they’re out there and I don’t get the right channel here in Canada or streaming service the way it is now. I just suspect they are in many cases, nowhere to be found. Sadly. As a collector I can’t help my self I suppose.

  2. Jeff Chandler is excellent, both in: ‘Because Of You’ (1952), with Loretta Young in an uncharacteristic part as a reformed gangster’s moll, and Chandler as the scion of a rich and social family (a part that gives scope to the acting abilities he could not often display in most of the films he made). I recommend this, as well as: ‘A Stranger In My Arms’ (1959), in which Mary Astor uses emotional blackmail to keep her son’s widow (played by June Allyson) by her, and a different kind of blackmail to encourage Chandler, a Korean War test pilot, to recommend her neurotic dead son (with whom he was trapped on a raft for twelve days, after an aeroplane crash) for a posthumous Congressional Medal Of Honor. Charles Coburn and Sandra Dee are also in the cast. I am a great fan of Alan Ladd and Veronica Lake, but have not seen: ‘Saigon’, because I do not like adventure films, even if they are tinged with noir.

    • Thanks for the nod to those Chandler films. I’ve always found him totally watchable in movies even if he wasn’t the greatest actor of his generation. Had a cool voice and that helped I’m sure. Iv’e always liked Ladd films so this one glares out at me since I haven’t seen it and I do so like Miss Lake in comedic roles that I think it’s a shame I haven’t been exposed to more of her light films aside from Sullivan’s Travels and I Married a Witch

      • I do not think she made any well-written, sophisticated, comedies, apart from those you mention – only silly, musical reviews, and small or uncredited parts in inferior would-be comedies. Nevertheless, I agree with you about her comic abilities – and potential.

    • I have not and after a quick bit of research it sounds like a good one for some of these so called “boutique” labels like Vinegar Syndrome or Severin to issue on blu ray. Thanks for the notice. I’ll be keeping my eyes open.

      • There are some troubles re the copyright of THE FARMER, that is why it seems to have shown up nowhere since its initial release, which I missed (well, I was 11 at that time, but I still, do remember its trailer! – which means a lot after so many years). Saying ismyhat some labels tried a DVD release, but it did not happen. I am a sucker for well made revenge flicks and this should be quite a good one, judging from comments people made, who have seen it back then. Would be a shame if it never shows up again.

        Re THE MIGHTY Oliver Reed, SITTING TARGET is a must see!

        Great site, just came over it recently and it is yet the only one coming near the site of OUTLAW VERN.

        • I’m still thinking I know something about this movie but just can’t place it. Maybe I’ve seen the trailer as well or maybe I’ve come across the movie poster in collection. Almost sounds a bit like the mighty Rolling Thunder. Ages ago when I was just starting out this site and didn’t have as much to say I featured Sitting Target as part of week lon of Reed titles. I’m a big Reed fan so he’s always welcome here at Mike’s Take. Thanks again for sharing and always welcome. https://mikestakeonthemovies.com/2015/03/03/sitting-target-1972/

  3. What a great post! All movie buffs feel your pain… I’ve been looking for 2 early Humphrey Bogart movies for most of my life – ‘A Devil with Women’ (1930) & ‘Body and Soul’ (1931) – never been able to find them! There’s an early Edward G Robinson called ‘Night Ride’ (1931) which has always eluded me. Then there’s ‘Operation Snatch’ (1962) which – last thing I can trace – was owned outright by Peter O’Toole who was determined it would never be shown (no idea why – he’s not even in it!) Talking of which, I don’t know why you think Oliver Reed is in ‘Black Jack’ with Peter Cushing? He’s not as far as I can recall & you should be grateful for that is one awful film. I’ve seen all but one of Cushing’s movies (Women in War (1940) – another one on the list!) and ‘Black Jack’ for my money is the worst thing Cushing ever appeared in – with ‘A Touch of the Sun’ close behind! An online movie collector I know has been looking for ‘Adventures End’ for decades and is starting to believe it’s lost so I wouldn’t hold your breath on that one. However, to ease your pain, I can get you a few of the ones you’ve mentioned: Idol of the Crowds, Iron Man, Because of You, A Stranger in My Arms, Smuggler’s Island, Sign of the Pagan, The Mongols, Dirty Weekend, The Lady in the Car With Glasses and a Gun, Saigon, Out of this World, Miss Susie Slagels, Slattery’s Hurricane, Black Midnight, Peking Express, Women of All Nations (I have 2 copies from different sources – obtaned many years apart – and I haven’t gotten around to watching the second one yet, but the first is of such poor quality as to be almost unwatchable – Bogart might be in the background on some shots but there’s no way you’d ever know!), Tanganyika, Soft Beds Hard Battles, Ghost In the Noonday Sun (yes, really!), The Redhead and the Cowboy, Little Egypt, Devil’s Daffodil, Beyond Mombasa, Eve aka The Face of Eve, Sugarfoot, These are digital files – not DVDs – but should be able to burn them onto discs for you if you don’t do digital file transfer. Mind you, not sure when I’d be able to get to the post office – we’re locked down tight where I live.

    • Thanks. Been working on this idea for a while, just needed to come up with an approach I liked. Can’t help you with the Bogie movies. Took me a long time to finally see Up the River but thankfully it turned up in a John Ford set. And right you are about the Reed/Cushing mix up. Meant to write it the other way. LOL. Another Peter movie I’ve yet to see is Tender Dracula and was surprised I found Hitler’s Son on youtube. Never thought I’d see that misfire. Battleflag is another Cushing effort I’ve no idea where to find if it exists. Stay safe is in order and I’ll assume you’re watching a ton of movies in lockdown as I did last April and May. We’re not in a hard lockdown so I’m back to my one a day or slightly better on average.

  4. It seems like TCM showed ‘Bring on the Girls’ and ‘Hold That Blonde’ a couple months back along with ‘The Redhead and the Cowboy’. Probably back in August when they do the Summer Under the Stars theme.

    As for a lot of those titles, I know I’ve seen them on film listings. I think Sinister Cinema is still around, used to be a mail order video shop, lots of great old titles with a huge selection of B-westerns.

    A good many of those European films used to be available through Video Search of Miami back when they were in business. The owner sold off their film library to various companies like Blue Underground and others.

    ‘The Day the Clown Cried’, that’s Jerry Lewis’ controversial holocaust film isn’t it? It seems like maybe Criterion had that a couple years back.

    • I remember that Sinister Cinema outfit from years ago. Hadn’t heard that title in a long time. You might be right on TCM showing those titles but then I might not have missed them either. The schedule the channel gives us in Canada is different than the U.S. one at times due to legal rights on who owns a film in a given country. No one has put out the Clown flick from Lewis just yet. I think he may have given up the rights but had something to do with so many years after his death before being marketed. Not sure on the exact details.

  5. Had to smile at Moviefanman describing the journey as often being more fun than the destination. I’ve had that experience more than a few times, of finally catching up with an obscure movie I always wanted to see, only to think afterwards, “okay, now I see why that thing is so hard to find!” Right now, one of my journeys is looking up interesting titles I’ve found in the book Death on the Cheap: The Lost B Movies of Film Noir. I’ve located several already on Youtube; of course, the quality isn’t always the greatest, so that’s also a consideration as to whether I invest the time or not.
    I’ve also been looking up movies of the week from the late ’60s to mid ’80s time range on Youtube. Typically, these are titles I remember seeing when they first premiered on TV, and are still stuck in little corners of my mind all these years later. Last Halloween season I reviewed the 1979 TV movie Vampire with Richard Lynch, Jason Miller and E.G. Marshall. A very solid, effective movie that sadly only got a perfunctory VHS release before sinking into undeserved obscurity. The Youtube copy was soft-looking, but I still enjoyed re-discovering and dissecting it. Others that I would love to find decent copies of: The Brotherhood of the Bell with Glenn Ford, The Deadly Dream w/ Lloyd Bridges, and The Love War w/ Bridges and Angie Dickinson.
    Anyway, good luck with your continuing journey!

    • Yes sometimes the hunt ends in disappointment. Kind of like revisiting a childhood favorite but then sometimes those are films that we always hold near and dear. I too love those TV movies that were released in big numbers for years with plenty of old pros or up and comers starring in them. I saw Vampire on it’s first run and not since. Lynch made for a great vampire if memory serves. Brotherhood fo the Bell was by my recollection a really good film with Ford and Dean Jagger. Its out on DVD but it’s pricey last time I looked. Off I go again to check….. Love War was also a good one that had an Invaders feel wit those sunglasses and again two pros in the story. Thankfully some like Night Stalker and Night Strangler are treated properly and out on blu. Thanks for stopping and sharing.

  6. I omitted to mention what I consider two of Ladd’s best films: ‘And Now Tomorrow’ (1944), and: ‘The Great Gatsby’ (1949). In the first, he plays a doctor who may be able to cure Loretta Young of her deafness – but bears a social prejudice against her family, and so is reluctant to treat her. Beautifully produced, the film has a superb cast, including a young Barry Sullivan, Susan Hayward, Cecil Kellaway, and Beulah Bondi. The second is a more thoughtful version of Fitzgerald’s novel, and conveys a better feeling for the period than the ‘seventy-four extravaganza. The performances moreover are superior to those in the later film. I have but two reservations about the Ladd film, to wit, the casting of Betty Field as Daisy, and a pious speech Gatsby makes near the end, which must have been the doing of the censors. Note in particular, the superb performance by Ruth Hussey as Jordan.

  7. Great theme. It just wouldn’t be fun if we had seen all the films we want to see. Anyway, how do we know that some obscure ( or not) film will turn out to be great!
    I’ve seen four of the films you mention – Raw Wind in Eden , Because Of You, Stranger in My Arms and Sugarfoot. ( which I have reviewed). I checked on YT and ‘Stranger’, Iron Man and Sugarfoot are available.
    I have Julius Caesar on my ‘To watch ‘ list, and would like to see Joe Macbeth too.
    I remember catching up with Because Of You many years after my first viewing and being disappointed. My only memory of Stranger in My Arms was how old Mary Astor looked .
    Good luck !

    • We’re always on the chase I suppose and I’m always astonished that we have a hard time locating something that in the big picture are not all that old. It’s like archaeology almost! I recently read a book on Miss Astor. Carry on with the hunt.

  8. I’ve seen several films on your list Mike but others have evaded me especially LITTLE EGYPT.
    QUEEN OF THE NILE was released recently in Germany in a deluxe mediabook edition DVD/Blu Ray combo and it is said to include the uncut Euro version.
    My “most wanted” title DEATH OVER MY SHOULDER (1959) directed by Arthur Crabtree (Horrors Of The Black Museum) starring Keefe Brasselle and Bonar Colleano this B Movie Brit Flick was certainly released and if you can source anything on the web you’re a better man than me. I know it was released as I’ve got a cinema listing for it., Also rare is another Brasselle/Crabtree Brit Flick WEST OF SUEZ (Fighting Wildcats) This one was picked up by Republic in America.

    • The two titles you mentioned are unfamiliar to me. Off I go to research. A good sight for some rare titles is called Rarefilmm Cave of Forgotten Movies. Lately the site has had issues with copyright infringement so not all titles are streaming but plenty to look thru.

  9. JOE MACBETH would make a great double bill with anoither Douglas starrer THE GAMMA PEOPLE Warwick Films only venture into Sci Fi. Speaking of Warwick there are plenty of their films that need a Blu Ray release including A PRIZE OF GOLD with Widmark and HIGH FLIGHT with Milland not to mention THE BANDIT OF ZHOBE (Mature) and KILLERS OF KILLIMANJARO (Taylor) It would also be timely to release Warwick’s NO TIME TO DIE (aka Tank Force)

  10. I guess you already know this but BEYOND MOMBASSA was released on a very nice looking MOD/DVD by Sony several years back I understand it’s still available.

  11. Slattery’s Hurricane aired on the old Fox Movie Channel, since I saw it there once ages ago. I’m guessing it was before I started my blog, which is coming up on 13 years now, since I don’t have a post on the movie on my blog.

    One movie I’ve wanted TCM to show ever since I saw the title is “Joe and Ethel Turp Call on the President”.

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Once upon a screen...

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Once upon a screen...

...a classic film and TV blog

The Magnificent 60s

by Brian Hannan

LOST IN SPACE FIRESIDE

A Galaxy of Rewind

Lazarus' Lair

NOT Just another WordPress.com weblog

"DESTROY ALL FANBOYS!"

Smashing System Bias Since 1972...

Movies ala Mark

With a Cast of Thousands

Classic Horrors

From silent screen to Halloween, and everything scary in between.

Just Hit Play

The Good, the Bad and sometimes Ugly in film

Strother Martin Film Project

What we've got here is failure to communicate

Sophia Riley Kobacker

it's all about the story, possums...

Wolfmans Cult Film

Cult, B-Movies, cheesy fun films to Film Noir to classics new to me.

Talking Pulp

All things pulp and then some

cinema cities

a personal odyssey through film

Mark David Welsh

Feeding Soda Pop to the Thirsty Pigs since 2013

Film Speech

All things film and television

Diary of A Movie Maniac

A Personal Journey Through Cinema & Television

portraitsbyjenni

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Methodically replaying every game of the 1978 baseball season!

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by John Bengtson "the great detective of silent film locations" New York Times

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