Skip to content

The Walking Hills (1949)

Long associated with tough, male dominated pictures like The Magnificent Seven, Bad Day At Black Rock and The Great Escape, director John Sturges got an early go around with a likewise production here under the Columbia banner featuring an almost exclusively male cast. One led by western icon Randolph Scott that while not exactly a western keeps Mr. Scott in a familiar setting and cowboy hat.

Scott along with producer Harry Joe Brown team with Sturges and a solid cast heading out to Death Valley in search of lost gold for this fast paced 78 minute black and white feature. The setting is current to the year of the film’s release along the Mexico border where men who have a warrant issued on them for crimes committed in the U.S. seek refuge just over the borderline. Crossing the line and looking nervous as the film opens is William Bishop closely followed by detective John Ireland. John appears to be closing in on his man. In little screen time at all, Bishop takes refuge in a cantina where a poker game is going on in the back room. He sets in and shortly thereafter Ireland does the same.

 

The key players in the plot are all seated in the game or around the table. Along with Bishop and Ireland we have headliner Scott, Arthur Kennedy, Edgar Buchanan, Russell Collins, Jerome Courtland and Josh White who will be supplying some first rate blues and guitar playing along the journey. It’s not only the cards that some players are keeping close to their vest in this game. When old time prospector Buchanan relates the story of a wagon train loaded with gold lost to the desert area known as The Walking Hills nearly a hundred years ago, young Courtland innocently mentions how he happened across a wagon wheel just recently in the same area. And with that these treasure hunters are born and married to each other as greed quickly becomes a dominating force among some of the members of this expedition.

Once the gang cross the border back into the U.S. and head for the Sierra Madre’s …… sorry about that but this film coming out just one year after Huston’s magnificent movie has to be more than just a coincidence. Anyway, the gang are in Death Valley when along comes Ella Raines who knows both Scott and Bishop and seems to have been a former lover of each. Miss Raines made her film debut opposite Scott in the 1943 Corvette K-225. Her past helps to unveil Bishop’s via a flashback in a plot full of twists and men looking over their shoulder wondering if Ireland’s self confessed cop is there to bring them in. As for Ireland, he’s content to let guilty men walk if they can dig up the long lost wagon train of Buchanan’s dreams.

Scott rides tall here as one might expect in a gang of unsavory characters. We know going in that he’s gonna do right by the fade out. Ireland is going to get a might greedy and as for Arthur Kennedy’s gold digger, he’s rather underused in the proceedings. The decade that followed would see him rise to the ranks of the number one villain in numerous films including some of the Anthony Mann westerns. Buchanan plays a role both he and movie goers were accustomed to seeing him in. That of a jovial lay about looking for an easy payday and one that the hero takes a liking to. Just as Scott does here.

Crisply directed by Sturges, this proved a great training ground for the eventual box office hits he’d helm in the not too distant future. Among them Gunfight at the O.K. Corral which also teamed him once again with Canadian actor John Ireland.

Randolph Scott is the star player here but this is more of an ensemble piece in a claustrophobic setting where the sand and heat are bound to prey on one’s nerves. That and the knowledge that Ireland’s cop might be after you. Sitting down to watch this Scott film, I had no idea what or where the plot was going to take me. I just assumed it was another Scott oater when in fact it’s far from it. It’s a modern day treasure hunt in need of horses which keeps Randy right at home. I came across this title as part of a TCM Vault Collection dedicated to Scott and can easily recommend this to those who haven’t seen it. And of course if you have, why not give it another look. Great cast and a rising director make the whole venture worth while.

15 Comments »

  1. It was ages before I ever had the chance to see this film and was delighted with it when I finally did. Sturges really excelled with these tight and taut vehicles he made early in his career, material so spare he filled every minute with something vital. A good role for Scott, and a good effort all round for those involved.

  2. Funny as a friend at work said he used to love all the Randolph Scott westerns. I had to shamefully admit to not knowing him. Looks like I’m doing the same here! Looks like he was one the great cowboy’s of the silver screen and unfortunately past me by. 😦

    • I’d actually argue Scott was the great cowboy of the silver screen, tough yet graceful and gracious, and just so damned comfortable and convincing in a western setting. I grew up watching his films on Saturday afternoons on TV and I’ve thoroughly enjoyed them ever since. Check out the movies he made with Boetticher, starting with the gloriously spare Seven Men from Now and I reckon you’ll never look back.

      • I second the Scott – Boetticher films. The other thing that’s fun in Scott film’s are the costars and in some cases future icons that appear opposite him as heavies like Borgnine, Marvin, Garner and Bronson among others.

      • Enjoyed Seven Men From Now very much. He has a great demeanor to him. Old, wise and thoughtful. Taking his time but quick as lightning. Was a nice surprise to see Lee Marvin appear. The run-time was good for a school night and a great way to be introduced to Scott. Will keep a look out for more to break up the crime dramas and noir. Many thanks.

        • Good film. I believe it was produced by John Wayne’s company BATJAC and was supposed to star Duke. Gail Russell was a frequent costar of Duke’s and somewhat of a pet project as she was self destructive and an alcoholic. Dead at 36. Sad. Many of Scott’s films are around 80 minutes so very easy to shoehorn in to a timely opportunity.

          • That’s interesting to hear it was produced by John Wayne’s company. I kind of imagined that they would of been stepping on each others toes and probably rivals, wishing to steer clear of each other. Who’s gonna be the boss cowboy. 🙂
            Oh that is indeed very sad to hear about Gail Russell, so very young, tragic.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s

Movies ala Mark

With a Cast of Thousands

Classic Horrors

From silent screen to Halloween, and everything scary in between.

IDENTIKIT

The current online container for the writer Konrad Wardh

Just Hit Play

The Good, the Bad and sometimes Ugly in film

Strother Martin Film Project

What we've got here is failure to communicate

Sophia Riley Kobacker

it's all about the story, possums...

Wolfmans Cult Film Club

Cult, B-Movies, cheesy fun films to Film Noir to classics new to me.

CINESPIRIA

Shining a light on the deep recesses of film history

cinema cities

a personal odyssey through film

Mark David Welsh

Watching the strangest movies - so you don't have to...

Scenes from the Morgue

The Lost Art of Pulp Ads: Film, Booze, Smokes & More!

Film Speech

All things film and television

Diary of A Movie Maniac

A Personal Journey Through Cinema & Television

portraitsbyjenni

My perspective on life & Classic Movie Recommendations

Statis Pro 1978 Replay

Methodically replaying every game of the 1978 baseball season!

4 Star Films

Looking deeper at the best classic movies

everythingnoir

Movies, Television, Books....Everything Noir

Chaplin-Keaton-Lloyd film locations (and more)

by John Bengtson "the great detective of silent film locations" New York Times

Sister Celluloid

Where old movies go to live

Silent-ology

Uncovering the silent era

Canadian Cinephile

"The only way to get rid of my fears is to make films about them." - Alfred Hitchcock

Noirish

The annex to John Grant's *A Comprehensive Encyclopedia of Film Noir*

Cinema Monolith

Reviews of movies from my giant DVD tower, and more.

Sunset Boulevard

Writings of a Cinephile

The Bogie Film Blog

A Film by Film Affair with Humphrey Bogart

Vienna's Classic Hollywood

Vintage Hollywood films and stars

The Film Authority

You're ten seconds from watching an amazing film...

Once upon a screen...

...a classic film and TV blog

shadowsandsatin

. . where the worlds of film noir and pre-code collide . .

hitchcockmaster

Where Suspense Lives!

Tipping My Fedora

Enjoying mystery, crime and suspense in all media

Silver Screenings

an irreverent blog of old movies

monsterminions

They Don't Make 'Em Like They Used To

Comet Over Hollywood

Home for classic movie lovers

filmgeek101

classic movie views for the classic and not-so-classic movie fan

Riding the High Country

Reviews and ramblings

Speakeasy

watching movies

Movies ala Mark

With a Cast of Thousands

Classic Horrors

From silent screen to Halloween, and everything scary in between.

IDENTIKIT

The current online container for the writer Konrad Wardh

Just Hit Play

The Good, the Bad and sometimes Ugly in film

Strother Martin Film Project

What we've got here is failure to communicate

Sophia Riley Kobacker

it's all about the story, possums...

Wolfmans Cult Film Club

Cult, B-Movies, cheesy fun films to Film Noir to classics new to me.

CINESPIRIA

Shining a light on the deep recesses of film history

cinema cities

a personal odyssey through film

Mark David Welsh

Watching the strangest movies - so you don't have to...

Scenes from the Morgue

The Lost Art of Pulp Ads: Film, Booze, Smokes & More!

Film Speech

All things film and television

Diary of A Movie Maniac

A Personal Journey Through Cinema & Television

portraitsbyjenni

My perspective on life & Classic Movie Recommendations

Statis Pro 1978 Replay

Methodically replaying every game of the 1978 baseball season!

4 Star Films

Looking deeper at the best classic movies

everythingnoir

Movies, Television, Books....Everything Noir

Chaplin-Keaton-Lloyd film locations (and more)

by John Bengtson "the great detective of silent film locations" New York Times

Sister Celluloid

Where old movies go to live

Silent-ology

Uncovering the silent era

Canadian Cinephile

"The only way to get rid of my fears is to make films about them." - Alfred Hitchcock

Noirish

The annex to John Grant's *A Comprehensive Encyclopedia of Film Noir*

Cinema Monolith

Reviews of movies from my giant DVD tower, and more.

Sunset Boulevard

Writings of a Cinephile

The Bogie Film Blog

A Film by Film Affair with Humphrey Bogart

Vienna's Classic Hollywood

Vintage Hollywood films and stars

The Film Authority

You're ten seconds from watching an amazing film...

Once upon a screen...

...a classic film and TV blog

shadowsandsatin

. . where the worlds of film noir and pre-code collide . .

hitchcockmaster

Where Suspense Lives!

Tipping My Fedora

Enjoying mystery, crime and suspense in all media

Silver Screenings

an irreverent blog of old movies

monsterminions

They Don't Make 'Em Like They Used To

Comet Over Hollywood

Home for classic movie lovers

filmgeek101

classic movie views for the classic and not-so-classic movie fan

Riding the High Country

Reviews and ramblings

Speakeasy

watching movies

%d bloggers like this: